Executive Function

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Supporting Online Learning Using the Brain’s Natural Strengths

Online learning requires considerably more voluntary focus and the ability to persist when an effort is needed. By using the four pillars of learning, active engagement, attention, error feedback, and consolidation you can support all your students when they are learning away from the classroom.

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Five Strategies for Helping Students with LDs Avoid Procrastination

Studies show that many students postpone their schoolwork, which affects school performance. Procrastination is particularly present in students with learning disabilities (LDs), where resilience and persistence in dealing with a task are often weaker. 

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Keeping School Work on Track: Staying Organized with Graphic Organizers

Students with a learning disability (LD) often have difficulty keeping schoolwork organized.  A graphic organizer can help students organize assignments into manageable pieces and guide them through the process to completion. 

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What strategies can we use to improve a student’s flexibility?

Much of the time, flexibility problems persist less because of a lack of objectively good strategies and more because of a lack of the motivation, engagement, and interest to get behind a strategy and apply it.

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Adapted Webinar: Beyond “Lazy” and “Unmotivated” – Why Educators Need to Know about Executive Skills

This webinar was adapted from a keynote address delivered at the LD@school Educators’ Institute in 2017. The LD@school team is pleased to present the session: Beyond “Lazy" and "Unmotivated” - Why Educators Need to Know about Executive Skills presented by Dr. Peg Dawson.

By |November 4th, 2019|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments
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How can Speech-Language Pathologists Support Students with LDs to Learn Math?

Sabrina O'Keefe, a Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP), answers two questions about the ways in which SLPs can help students with LDs aquire math skills.

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Activated Learning for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Mainstream, Whole-Class, Executive Function Intervention that is Necessary for Some and Good for All

“Activated Learning” (AL), also called the “EFs2theRescue Pedagogy” in Guare and Dawson’s 3rd edition of Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents, is an adaptive executive function (EF) intervention that aims to facilitate high-impact teaching and learning that is necessary for some and good for all in typical classrooms. AL is a self-regulated learning pedagogy that, among other benefits, allows teachers to support students with learning disabilities (LDs) as part of their everyday teaching. It was developed in 2014 by a special education teacher (the author) and has been championed by hundreds of educators in several school boards in Canada, the U.S. and the U.K.

By |July 9th, 2018|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
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LEARNING MODULE: An In-Depth Look at Executive Functions

This module is intended to provide an in-depth exploration of executive functions, as they relate to students with learning disabilities (LDs) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), at all grade levels. The eight pillars of executive functioning will be described, along with indicators and strategies for the classroom. You will gain familiarity...

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LEARNING MODULE: An Introduction to Learning Disabilities in the Classroom

This online module is intended to provide an introduction to literacy, numeracy, executive function, and social and emotional development as well as an introductory overview of Ministry documents such as PPM8 and Learning for All, as they relate to students with learning disabilities.

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WEBINAR RECORDING: Leading the Implementation of Neurodiverse Practice in the Classroom and School

Neurodiversity is a term that refers to the range of neurological differences that occur in the brain as a result of natural variations in the human genome; these neurological differences include attention deficit hyperactive disorder, autism, learning disabilities and dyslexia. Neurodiversity overthrows ableist beliefs and practices that may marginalize students with learning disabilities in the classroom and school community, and embraces the strengths and abilities of individuals with neurological differences, while acknowledging the inherent and associated challenges.

By |October 30th, 2017|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , , |0 Comments