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Planning and Teaching with Explicit Instruction

Sarah Calvin, OCT, Producer of Bilingual Educational Content with the LD@school team “Explicit instruction is a group of research-supported instructional behaviors used to design and deliver instruction that provides needed supports for successful learning through clarity of language and purpose, and reduction of cognitive load. It promotes active student engagement by requiring frequent and varied [...]

Using Project-Based Learning in the Classroom

By Richard Parker, OCT, Google Certified Educator, Halton District School Board Project Based Learning (PBL) is “a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging, and complex question, problem, or challenge” (Buck Institute for Education, n.d.). PBL brings [...]

Technology for Reading

This article is an excerpt from the LD@school learning module Technology for All: Supporting Students with LDs by Integrating Technology into Classroom Instruction. Click here to access this module. The act of reading simultaneously draws on many different processes: a reader must decode words, know what they mean, understand words when they are strung together in [...]

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How to Foster a Positive Classroom Environment

According to the discussion document, Ontario’s Well-Being Strategy for Education (2016), “well-being is a positive sense of self, spirit and belonging that we feel when our cognitive, emotional, social and physical needs are being met” (p. 3). Well-being is fundamental to overall student success.

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Activated Learning for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Mainstream, Whole-Class, Executive Function Intervention that is Necessary for Some and Good for All

“Activated Learning” (AL), also called the “EFs2theRescue Pedagogy” in Guare and Dawson’s 3rd edition of Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents, is an adaptive executive function (EF) intervention that aims to facilitate high-impact teaching and learning that is necessary for some and good for all in typical classrooms. AL is a self-regulated learning pedagogy that, among other benefits, allows teachers to support students with learning disabilities (LDs) as part of their everyday teaching. It was developed in 2014 by a special education teacher (the author) and has been championed by hundreds of educators in several school boards in Canada, the U.S. and the U.K.

By |July 9th, 2018|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Strategies and Structures to Support Independent Reading in Students with Learning Disabilities

Independent reading provides students with an opportunity to practice the decoding and comprehension strategies and skills learned during class time on self-selected materials.  Not only does independent reading provide additional practice time for students, but it also fosters independence (Johnson & Keire, 2010).  TeachHub (n.d.) cites independent reading as the opportunity for students to “dive [...]

By |July 6th, 2018|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
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IEP Development for a Student with a Learning Disability: The Power of Accommodations

The team has made the decision; an IEP will be developed to further support the student. The process begins and sometimes those collaborating in the development of the IEP can end up feeling quite overwhelmed. The timelines, the decisions that need to be made, familiarity with the software and the conscientious desire to develop a [...]

By |June 15th, 2018|Categories: IEPs|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments
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Identifying and Addressing Stressors in your Classroom

This article is an excerpt from the LD@school learning module Supporting the Well-Being and Mental Health of Students with Learning Disabilities. Click here to access this module. Everyone experiences stress from time to time. It is a natural reaction to certain events in our lives, such as demands at work or at school, uncertainty around [...]

Learning to Read: The Importance of Both Phonological and Morphological Approaches

One of the main reading difficulties people with LDs have is in decoding printed words. People without LDs often use a phonics approach to sound out unfamiliar words but that does not work as well for many people with LDs who have difficulty in phonological processing – that is, in hearing the different sounds in words. They may also have difficulty associating sounds with letters (Lyon, 1995). This, in turn, interferes not only with the ability to sound out unfamiliar words but it also strongly affects spelling – for how could someone spell a word accurately when they do not hear all of the sounds in the word?

By |April 25th, 2018|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
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Beyond Social Skills: Understanding and Supporting Social Competence in Students with LDs

Social competence requires more than just social skills; it is a complex and interconnected set of skills that enables us to navigate social interactions and initiate and maintain relationships with others.