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  • self-regulation

An Introduction to Self-Regulation

by Michael Fairbrother and Dr. Jessica Whitley What Is Self-regulation? Self-regulated learning is a process that assists students in managing their thoughts, behaviours, and emotions in order to successfully navigate their learning experiences (Zumbrunn, Tadlock, & Roberts, 2011). According to Canadian researcher, Shanker (2012), “self-regulation refers to a child’s ability to deal with stressors effectively and efficiently and then return to a baseline [...]

An Introduction to Working Memory

What is Working Memory? Working memory refers to a brain system, or mental workspace, responsible for temporarily storing and manipulating information. It is different from short-term memory, where information is stored and recalled in the same format; for example, students can hold a set of numbers in short term memory, but in order to repeat [...]

By |January 27th, 2017|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , |0 Comments
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Designing Accessible Classroom Websites

Do you have your own classroom website, or do educators in your school have their own websites? When these websites are designed, is there thought being applied to those students who may have accessibility challenges? Students with learning disabilities (LDs) are not the only students who may have difficulty accessing online content, so it is good practice to design with accessibility in mind. The LD@school team has put together some background information on why designing accessible classroom websites is important, as well as some simple steps educators can take to ensure they are designing websites that can be easily navigated by everyone.

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Choosing Appropriate Assistive Technology for Students with ADHD

Without appropriate accommodations, students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find themselves at a disadvantage. If these students are then asked to “try harder”, despite making an effort that may already be above and beyond what is expected or necessary for their peers, they may develop anxiety and low self-esteem related to their difficulty in learning.

Google Docs, Apps and Add-ons for Students with LDs

What are Google Docs, Apps and Add-ons and why should my students with LDs use them? Let’s start with a review of both differentiated instruction (DI) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to answer that question.

By |August 30th, 2016|Categories: Technology|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Elementary to Secondary: Transition Planning for Students with LDs

The transition from elementary to secondary school is generally considered to be one of the most challenging for adolescents, both with and without LDs. This practice-informed summary focuses on the key considerations and steps to support a successful transition from elementary school to secondary school for students with LDs.

By |July 22nd, 2016|Categories: Transitions|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Effective Parent-Teacher Partnerships: Considerations for Educators

Educators and parents generally agree that positive, supportive and open relationships between home and school, parent and teacher are desirable. Additionally, research has shown that parent engagement and successful parent-teacher partnerships result in improved educational outcomes for students (Ministry of Education, 2010), and this is especially important for students with learning disabilities (LDs). So what can educators and administrators do to help facilitate a positive partnership?

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Strategies to Support Students with Learning Disabilities who Experience Anxiety

In this summary, anxiety refers to fears that are out of proportion to the danger and that adversely affects a student’s ability to function in daily life (Turgeon and Brousseau, 2000). According to the research, many students with LDs show signs of short- and long-term stress that can lead to anxiety and affect them throughout their lives (Painchaud, 2014, p. 4). This summary offers educators an overview of these signs, as well as strategies for supporting students with LDs who experience anxiety at school.

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Dyslexia: When Hidden Talents are Awakened

Dyslexia, a specific learning disability, is more often investigated on the basis of its limitations than its strengths. The purpose of this article, which is primarily based on a survey of the scientific literature on the hidden potential of individuals with dyslexia, is to increase awareness amongst educators of the complexity of this disability and to offer a fair, even promising, representation of dyslexia. In so doing, it invites educators to reflect on their own perceptions of dyslexia.

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Mind Maps

This summary looks at an interesting technique that helps students, particularly elementary-level students, to draw out and organize their knowledge about a given subject or a main idea. Mind mapping, also known as cognitive mapping or concept mapping, was developed in the 1970s by British psychologist Tony Buzan (Buzan, 2011). Essentially, a mind map is a visual tool, or diagram, used to organize information.

By |March 2nd, 2016|Categories: Executive Function|Tags: , , , |0 Comments