Right To Read

  • direct instruction reading

Betting on Success: Teaching Reading through the Principles of Direct Instruction in a Regular Classroom

Reading is a significant area of need throughout Ontario schools. Too many students have gaps in too many areas of reading, impacting not only the day-to-day instruction in our classrooms, but the face of education as a whole. Direct Instruction is needed to remediate those gaps and build literate children who are equipped with a variety of strategies to decode words and comprehend ideas. In order to provide our students with the quality of reading instruction they need, we as teachers need to better understand the skills that build readers and provide consistent opportunities for practice and application.

By |March 9th, 2021|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments
  • Oral language disorder

Oral Language Skills and Learning Disabilities: A Review for Educators  

Having impaired oral language skills can impact learning in all subject areas and thus have an enormous effect on school success. It is not surprising then, that children with a persistent problem learning language, known as Developmental Language Disorder (DLD), are at an increased risk of poorer academic and social performance.

  • Response to Intervention

Using the Response to Intervention (RTI) Model to Develop Reading Fluency in Grade 2 Students 

Teachers devote a lot of energy to teaching students to become competent readers, which is even more challenging in the inclusive classroom where some students have reading difficulties. This article examines the efficacy of a teaching activity program designed and tested in the three tiers of the Response to Intervention (RTI) model.

By |May 27th, 2020|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

VIDEO: Supporting Struggling Readers: How School Leaders Contribute to Effective Reading Programs

This video provides viewers with the opportunity to develop an understanding of the key role school administrators play in determining effective reading programs for students with LDs in the area of reading.

By |July 30th, 2018|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
  • 5 Primary students with books

LEARNING MODULE: Reading 1-3: Supporting Struggling Readers

This module is intended to provide an introductory overview of the components of reading instruction in the primary years, and how to tailor instruction to meet the needs of struggling readers, some of whom may have learning disabilities (LDs). The module will present the various ways that LDs can affect reading development, and will provide guidance for educators in developing a balanced reading program that supports the needs of all learners while maintaining their motivation to read.

By |June 20th, 2018|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Learning to Read: The Importance of Both Phonological and Morphological Approaches

One of the main reading difficulties people with LDs have is in decoding printed words. People without LDs often use a phonics approach to sound out unfamiliar words but that does not work as well for many people with LDs who have difficulty in phonological processing – that is, in hearing the different sounds in words. They may also have difficulty associating sounds with letters (Lyon, 1995). This, in turn, interferes not only with the ability to sound out unfamiliar words but it also strongly affects spelling – for how could someone spell a word accurately when they do not hear all of the sounds in the word?

By |April 25th, 2018|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments
  • Image of the Ask the Experts Logo

How can educators help parents to support reading skills acquisition and knowledge retention at home?

Answered  by Nathalie Paquet-Bélanger Learning to read is a crucial part of school learning; often, a positive experience of learning to read helps a child to stay in school later on. Educators who support parents’ efforts at home increase the likelihood that their students will succeed. Here are six tips for teachers who want to [...]

By |November 11th, 2015|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
  • Image of a brain.

Reading and the Brain: Strategies for Decoding, Fluency, and Comprehension

There are a number of valuable resources for teaching children with reading problems and reading LDs. The following evidence-based intervention strategies were developed based on a number of important resources. Several of these intervention strategies recognize the National Reading Panel (2000) findings that effective reading instruction addresses alphabetics, fluency, and comprehenison.

By |May 15th, 2015|Categories: Literacy|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Commercial Reading Programs for Students with Learning Disabilities: Examining the Evidence Base

By Kelly Ryan Hicks and James B. Hale Commercial Reading Programs: Being an Informed Consumer Commercial reading programs are useful as they may provide the instructional methods and materials all in one package. Most websites and promotional materials “sound good” when first looking at them. This makes it difficult to determine which programs may be [...]

  • A teacher using explicit instruction for math

Explicit Instruction: A Teaching Strategy in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics for Students with Learning Disabilities

Explicit instruction involves using highly structured and sequenced steps to teach a specific skill. With this approach, the educator intentionally aims to teach students with learning disabilities using a series of actions in three main stages.